Ask Candid Candace--send your questions to CandidCandace@ChicagoStarMedia.com.

Ask Candid Candace--send your questions to CandidCandace@ChicagoStarMedia.com.

Dear Candid Candace:

I'm one of your younger readers and am looking for some advice on how to handle a sensitive social situation. I play basketball for my high school and, both last year and this year, I have kind of developed a crush on a cheerleader. But, the problem is she is a cheerleader for the opposing school -not ours!  Is it okay to date someone from another school? And any advice on how I break the ice?  (We only play them two times a season so I don’t see her that much.)

---Jumping Through Hoops

Dear Jumping Through Hoops,

Memories you make during high school are ever-lasting and form who you become in later years. You will always remember your first crushes so, if you're attracted to her, invite her out on a date. Maybe the next time you play each other, you can get a message to her that you're interested. Being from another school shouldn't be viewed as a negative, it could be an asset. Think of the new friends you might make!  And, if she's not interested, no harm, no foul. Remember what hockey great Wayne Gretzky said, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." 

Dear Candid Candace

I have a fight with my kids every year, and I know it will be the same this year. When the weather gets really cold, they refuse to wear the heavy jacket and gloves and hats that they have, and instead prefer hooded sweatshirts and maybe a cap that doesn’t even cover the ears! They get sick at least once a year but tell me it’s not cool to wear all that heavy winter clothing. Any advice for a mom losing ground in this yearly battle?

---Winter Weather Wendy

Dear Winter Weather Wendy,

The fact is that while the weather is not directly responsible for making people sick, the viruses that cause colds may spread more easily in lower temperatures, and exposure to cold and dry air may adversely impact the body's immune system. However, it's a common misconception that you must wear heavy clothing to avoid "catching a cold." This stems from an old wives' tale and is a by-product of a bygone era when the idea of germs and viruses were still misunderstood. The biggest risks associated with going out in the cold under-dressed are hypothermia and frostbite, which can both lower the body's immune system. This lowering of the immune system can, in part, affect your child's likelihood of catching a virus but it won't guarantee it.

Send questions to: CandidCandace@ChicagoStarMedia.com. Follow Candid Candace (Candace Jordan) on Facebook, Insta, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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